Category Archives: Culture

Examples of how small wins can build a more engaged, innovative & productive culture

How a 1% change made a real difference

How a 1% change made a real difference
In 2010, Dave Brailsford faced a tough job*. No British cyclist had ever won the Tour de France, but as the new General Manager and Performance Director for Team Sky (Great Britain’s professional cycling team), Brailsford was asked to change that. His approach was simple. Brailsford believed in a concept that he referred to as the “aggregation of marginal gains.” He explained it as “the 1 percent margin for improvement in everything you do.” His belief was that if you improved every area ... Read more

Achieving any big goal starts with a series of small wins.

Achieving any big goal starts with a series of small wins.
One of my favourite exercises in my small wins innovation workshops is to encourage leadership groups or teams to outline the steps involved in obtaining a driving license. Think about it. It takes 120 hours of driving and a minimum of 12 months (in Australia), with an experienced driver. Notice how each skill or step then builds to another e.g. turning then reversing. It is the same with achieving any big goal. The more you can break it down to a series of small steps the more achievable ... Read more

Qantas Change for Good Program

Qantas Change for Good Program
This is a great example of small wins innovation. Qantas has teamed up with UNICEF and for 23 years has been running their change for good program. Passengers donate their spare change — everyday; every flight. It’s a small ask for passengers yet over time can have a big impact. The program has raised over $30 million dollars to-date! A beautiful example of cultural change build upon a continuous program that works. Also a great example of a win -win.  Benefits Unicef and Qantas ... Read more

How to ask a more engaging question

How to ask a more engaging question
How you ask a question can have a big impact on the other person’s engagement with you. They could be a peer, user or customer. For example, my wife and I were eating breakfast at a cafe and the owner asked how is everything? We said fine — end of engagement. If he had asked for example: If there is one thing that we could improve in your meal what might that be? Now this is an engaging question. In this case both meals had too much salt. A small change but a big potential ... Read more